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Joseph Nechtval:

"Immersion Into Noise" is intended as a conceptual handbook useful for the development of a personal-political-visionary art of noise. On a planet that is increasingly technologically linked and globally mediated, how might noises break and reconnect in distinctive and productive ways within practices located in the world of art and thought? That is the question Joseph Nechvatal explores in “Immersion Into Noise.”

Joseph Nechtval:

"Immersion Into Noise" is intended as a conceptual handbook useful for the development of a personal-political-visionary art of noise. On a planet that is increasingly technologically linked and globally mediated, how might noises break and reconnect in distinctive and productive ways within practices located in the world of art and thought? That is the question Joseph Nechvatal explores in “Immersion Into Noise.”

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NYTimes.com:

 You once described your sound as “post-Internet.” Can you expand on this?
Neurologically, until you’re about 12 or 13 years old, your brain is very plastic, which means that the neural pathways that you’re carving are kind of endless and you’re not really specializing in anything but you’re learning really fast. And then around the time you hit puberty, you begin to develop muscle memory in the pathways you’re using most frequently and really hone your skills. Historically people ride bikes and whatever — and those are skills you’ll have for the rest of your life. So what’s interesting about my generation and people younger than me, is that when I was 12 or 13, we just got Napster and we just got the Internet and the thing that I learned to do, or the sort of overwhelming craft in my life at the time besides ballet, was learning how to research really well. Especially in my relationship with music. It wasn’t like, “Oh I love punk music, I love country music.” It was very single oriented, it was very Napster oriented, where I wanted as much music as I could get. There was just so much stuff out there and it wasn’t about the process my parents had of going to the record store and falling in love with that record and becoming really well acquainted with that record. For me, it was more about constantly stimulating my brain with new stuff. I think that there is no way that that couldn’t influence the way you develop as a person, artistically. I mean it just physically would never have been possible for anyone really older than me to have that kind of experience and I think that one of the reasons music seems to be changing so drastically right now is that you have people coming of age who are the first generation of people that have this experience and we’re technically, biologically, different. From a neurological standpoint.

NYTimes.com:

You once described your sound as “post-Internet.” Can you expand on this?

Neurologically, until you’re about 12 or 13 years old, your brain is very plastic, which means that the neural pathways that you’re carving are kind of endless and you’re not really specializing in anything but you’re learning really fast. And then around the time you hit puberty, you begin to develop muscle memory in the pathways you’re using most frequently and really hone your skills. Historically people ride bikes and whatever — and those are skills you’ll have for the rest of your life. So what’s interesting about my generation and people younger than me, is that when I was 12 or 13, we just got Napster and we just got the Internet and the thing that I learned to do, or the sort of overwhelming craft in my life at the time besides ballet, was learning how to research really well. Especially in my relationship with music. It wasn’t like, “Oh I love punk music, I love country music.” It was very single oriented, it was very Napster oriented, where I wanted as much music as I could get. There was just so much stuff out there and it wasn’t about the process my parents had of going to the record store and falling in love with that record and becoming really well acquainted with that record. For me, it was more about constantly stimulating my brain with new stuff. I think that there is no way that that couldn’t influence the way you develop as a person, artistically. I mean it just physically would never have been possible for anyone really older than me to have that kind of experience and I think that one of the reasons music seems to be changing so drastically right now is that you have people coming of age who are the first generation of people that have this experience and we’re technically, biologically, different. From a neurological standpoint.

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Gilad Elbaz is trying to identify every fact in the world, and to hold them all in a company he calls Factual.

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KurzweilAI:

Computers will write more than 90 percent of news in 15 years, and will win a Pulitzer Prize within 5 years, says Kristian Hammond, CTO and cofounder of Narrative Science, a company that trains computers to write news stories.

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URB:

From Brooklyn Street Art, “as the planes spelled out #DefendTheArts over Manhattan, Saber explained to BSA in a phone interview, “Basically I’m calling out Mitt and any other politicians who are cutting arts funding because they are actually cutting jobs that are an engine to our economy. Not to mention the effect these programs have on creativity and inspiration.” One dot-matrix style message said “Protect NPR PBS NEA from cuts” while another offered the Twitter hashtag simply entitled ‘#MittRomneyHatesArt’.”

I support that.

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Cat and Girl, “Sponsored Content”
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Defining words, without the arbiters (via KurzweilAI)

Defining words, without the arbiters (via KurzweilAI)

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(Source: softsubs)

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Is the idea of “possessing” a digital file outdated? (via Popular Science)

Is the idea of “possessing” a digital file outdated? (via Popular Science)

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