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Studio Zimoun

Swiss sound / kinetic artist Zimoun creates works with simple materials - cardboard, motors, and cotton balls, to great effect. Here are a couple of examples embedded below:

In 2003, graphic designer Marc Beekhuis and Zimoun founded Leerraum [ ] - which has become a platform for artists, designers or architects,… who explore forms and structures based on reductive principles and careful yet radical use of materials.

«Using simple and functional components, Zimoun builds architecturally-minded platforms of sound. Exploring mechanical rhythm and flow in prepared systems, his installations incorporate commonplace industrial objects. In an obsessive display of curiously collected material, these works articulate a tension between the orderly patterns of Modernism and the chaotic forces of life. Carrying an emotional depth, the acoustic hum of natural phenomena blends effortlessly with electric reverberation in Zimoun’s minimalist constructions.» bitforms nyc

«The sound sculptures and installations of Zimoun are graceful, mechanized works of playful poetry, their structural simplicity opens like an industrial bloom to reveal a complex and intricate series of relationships, an ongoing interplay between the «artificial» and the «organic». It’s an artistic research of simple and elegant systems to generate and study complex behaviors in sound and motion. Zimoun creates sound pieces from basic components, often using multiples of the same prepared mechanical elements to examine the creation and degeneration of patterns.»

You can check out more works by Studio Zimoun at their website here,  as well as their Vimeo channel here

Zimoun Previously on PK

Tags: zimoun sound art
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Francis Fabiculanan’s 1979 Porsche 911 S (via European Car Magazine)

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"Compilation Video V3.1" (by Studio Zimoun)

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Swiss installation artist Zimoun chose a vast 1950s storage tank in Dottikon, Switzerland, as the site of his latest work (via Wallpaper* Magazine)

Swiss installation artist Zimoun chose a vast 1950s storage tank in Dottikon, Switzerland, as the site of his latest work (via Wallpaper* Magazine)

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craigology:

“Whirled Beat” 10-year-old boy drumming washing machine (original version) (by Dan Carollo)

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Popular Science:

The great American naturalist Aldo Leopold once wrote that he was glad he would not be young in a future without wilderness. Indeed, he may not have been thrilled to know the sonic environment he enjoyed each day is gone; the sound of highways now mingles with birdsong, which itself has changed with the redistribution of species. But he took such detailed and copious field notes that we can recreate that environment, hearing the sounds of nature as Leopold himself would have.

This “resurrected soundscape” is the first sonic setting to be recreated from real data, rather than from informed imagination, according to researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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Joseph Nechtval:

"Immersion Into Noise" is intended as a conceptual handbook useful for the development of a personal-political-visionary art of noise. On a planet that is increasingly technologically linked and globally mediated, how might noises break and reconnect in distinctive and productive ways within practices located in the world of art and thought? That is the question Joseph Nechvatal explores in “Immersion Into Noise.”

Joseph Nechtval:

"Immersion Into Noise" is intended as a conceptual handbook useful for the development of a personal-political-visionary art of noise. On a planet that is increasingly technologically linked and globally mediated, how might noises break and reconnect in distinctive and productive ways within practices located in the world of art and thought? That is the question Joseph Nechvatal explores in “Immersion Into Noise.”

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David Pescovitz:

The FM3 Buddha Machine was inspired by the cheap electronic Buddhist chant boxes sold in China and India that play infinite prayer loops. The video above is an ambient “jam session” between three of those chant boxes and a Raagini Electronic Digital Tanpura laying down the drone. The result is a kind of “generative art,” unique work created by computers from fixed parameters defined by a human artist.
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Michal Libera, Katarzyna Krakowiak, “Making the walls quake as if they were dilating with the secret knowledge of great powers” (by BiennaleChannel)