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Composer Jim Wilson recorded the sound of crickets, slowed down the recording and overlapped the two tracks.

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BoomRoom: mid-air direct interaction with virtual sound sources (via phys.org)

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From “The Tao of Rick,” via GQ:

Before Rick Rubin will talk to me about music, or listen to music, or talk about listening to music, he tells me I must hear everything.
We’re sitting on the patio of Rubin’s Malibu home, a modern architectural testament to his success as a music producer over the past thirty-one years, including work on Kanye’s 2013 album, Yeezus, and Eminem’s new single, “Berzerk.” I hear waves slapping the sand, a breeze whispering up the eucalyptus-covered hillside. I hear the neighbor’s goddamn leaf blower. Twenty seconds pass—a moment I’d normally think of as silent. “Let’s start with the sound of the ocean,” Rubin says, from somewhere deep inside his three-decade-long beard. “How does it make you feel?”
“Calm, grounded,” I tell him. He faces me and, I’m not kidding here, crosses his legs into a semi-lotus. “All of those elements, not just from nature but from what someone’s saying to you—all of those things play into listening to music,” he says. “When you really listen, it’s different. Let’s go listen.”

From “The Tao of Rick,” via GQ:

Before Rick Rubin will talk to me about music, or listen to music, or talk about listening to music, he tells me I must hear everything.

We’re sitting on the patio of Rubin’s Malibu home, a modern architectural testament to his success as a music producer over the past thirty-one years, including work on Kanye’s 2013 album, Yeezus, and Eminem’s new single, “Berzerk.” I hear waves slapping the sand, a breeze whispering up the eucalyptus-covered hillside. I hear the neighbor’s goddamn leaf blower. Twenty seconds pass—a moment I’d normally think of as silent. “Let’s start with the sound of the ocean,” Rubin says, from somewhere deep inside his three-decade-long beard. “How does it make you feel?”

“Calm, grounded,” I tell him. He faces me and, I’m not kidding here, crosses his legs into a semi-lotus. “All of those elements, not just from nature but from what someone’s saying to you—all of those things play into listening to music,” he says. “When you really listen, it’s different. Let’s go listen.”

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officefordesignoperations:

prostheticknowledge:

Studio Zimoun

Swiss sound / kinetic artist Zimoun creates works with simple materials - cardboard, motors, and cotton balls, to great effect. Here are a couple of examples embedded below:

In 2003, graphic designer Marc Beekhuis and Zimoun founded Leerraum [ ] - which has become a platform for artists, designers or architects,… who explore forms and structures based on reductive principles and careful yet radical use of materials.

«Using simple and functional components, Zimoun builds architecturally-minded platforms of sound. Exploring mechanical rhythm and flow in prepared systems, his installations incorporate commonplace industrial objects. In an obsessive display of curiously collected material, these works articulate a tension between the orderly patterns of Modernism and the chaotic forces of life. Carrying an emotional depth, the acoustic hum of natural phenomena blends effortlessly with electric reverberation in Zimoun’s minimalist constructions.» bitforms nyc

«The sound sculptures and installations of Zimoun are graceful, mechanized works of playful poetry, their structural simplicity opens like an industrial bloom to reveal a complex and intricate series of relationships, an ongoing interplay between the «artificial» and the «organic». It’s an artistic research of simple and elegant systems to generate and study complex behaviors in sound and motion. Zimoun creates sound pieces from basic components, often using multiples of the same prepared mechanical elements to examine the creation and degeneration of patterns.»

You can check out more works by Studio Zimoun at their website here,  as well as their Vimeo channel here

Zimoun Previously on PK

Tags: zimoun sound art
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Francis Fabiculanan’s 1979 Porsche 911 S (via European Car Magazine)

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"Compilation Video V3.1" (by Studio Zimoun)

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Swiss installation artist Zimoun chose a vast 1950s storage tank in Dottikon, Switzerland, as the site of his latest work (via Wallpaper* Magazine)

Swiss installation artist Zimoun chose a vast 1950s storage tank in Dottikon, Switzerland, as the site of his latest work (via Wallpaper* Magazine)

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craigology:

“Whirled Beat” 10-year-old boy drumming washing machine (original version) (by Dan Carollo)

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Popular Science:

The great American naturalist Aldo Leopold once wrote that he was glad he would not be young in a future without wilderness. Indeed, he may not have been thrilled to know the sonic environment he enjoyed each day is gone; the sound of highways now mingles with birdsong, which itself has changed with the redistribution of species. But he took such detailed and copious field notes that we can recreate that environment, hearing the sounds of nature as Leopold himself would have.

This “resurrected soundscape” is the first sonic setting to be recreated from real data, rather than from informed imagination, according to researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.